Bees and toads

I can only get to the allotment once per week but it changes so much with each visit. My courgettes are cropping in abundance. I’m not sure what to do with them all. I also got my first tomatoes and cucumbers of the season.

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I have heaps and heaps of kale. More than we could ever eat.

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There are so many insects there. I never use any poisons at home or the allotment. Even herbicides are harmful to bees because herbicides kill nectar-producing plants. Is it really necessary to kill every dandelion? Why not leave a few for the bees? I have a lot of borage in my garden and at the plot; the bees love it.

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I’ve also got lots of ladybugs.

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Why do people choose to create a monoculture of one species when they could have a variety of different species and a much more enriching environment? Someone I work with told me his wife works in a garden centre and she said that people just want to kill everything. It’s so strange and rather sad.

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Sadly, it wasn’t all good news at the plot. I found a toad corpse. He got tangled in the netting I use to protect the kale from birds. He must have had a horrible death. I felt awful. I cut him free and buried him. Whenever I see sea creatures tangled in fishing line I always feel a bit virtuous knowing that by not eating seafood I’m not contributing to that suffering.  However this toad’s death is entirely my fault.

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What else I could use to protect my kale without harming the wildlife? A fine mesh perhaps? I’m using a jute netting for my beans and I like it much more than the plastic stuff because it will biodegrade. It also has a bit of flexibility to it so I think it’s probably unlikely to strangle the wildlife. But maybe there’s something better?

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