Daffodils, jumping shot, and a roundup of the news

I ventured out for some exercise today. Mostly I stay in and just do The Body Coach live streaming in the morning followed by a trampoline bounce in the afternoon. It’s a lovely spring day today and the daffodils are in full bloom so it must be time for a jumping shot.

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Here’s a round-up of some interesting pandemic news from the past few days. First is this blog post from Victor about the reinfection of cured patients. The TLDR is they haven’t been reinfected, it’s a mistake in the test or the sample that was used and when it was taken.

Another interesting article is this one – Covid 19 and the elephant in the room – which explains the higher risk of mortality in patients with obesity and chronic metabolic disease like diabetes. Of the first 2204 patients admitted to intensive care in the UK with COVID-19, 72.7% were obese. Apparently excess body fat does dreadful things to the immune system. The logical conclusion to this is that now we’re all shut up inside for several months getting fat so that when restrictions are eventually lifted we’ll all die of COVID-19. Maybe WWII-style food rationing would be a good thing after all?

Also worth listening to, if you have time, is this Science and Technology Committee discussion with Professor Graham Medley, Dr James Rubin, and experts from China, Germany, and Austria.

Some interesting snippets from the meeting – Graham Medley explained when the epidemic will be over.

“The whole epidemic will be over only when we reach that point where the amount of resistance in the population is enough or susceptibility is low enough and the only ways we know how to do that are through as a consequence of natural immunity or acquired immunity built up through infection or vaccination.”

He went on to say whether that’s in 1 year or 5 years, we don’t know.

The expert from China discussed something I’d heard before which is that transmission is most likely to occur in the home. People are more likely to get infected by a family member than by someone outside the home. In Wuhan they dealt with this by taking the infected person out of the home and away from their family by putting them into quarantine which could be a hotel, government facility, or hospital.

Since a vaccine or all of us getting the virus is currently our only way to end the epidemic the government has today announced a vaccine taskforce. However, Sir Patrick Vallance urges realism in the press briefing about the likelihood of developing a vaccine, “realism [is] each single project does not have a high probability of success“.