Single-function devices and other things

You know those times when you have a brilliant idea that you’re convinced everyone will love? But when you pitch it no-one else is remotely interested? Or those times you learn something new and it feels like you’ve always known it and that everyone else should also know it but you forget that most other people don’t? Or before you learn a new skill it seems really hard but once you’ve mastered it it seems easy? How can the same thing be hard and easy at the same time? How come I assume everyone else knows what I know? But most concerning: why doesn’t everyone love my ideas?

Today I bought myself a single-function device: a wristwatch. I haven’t had a wristwatch for many years – not since I started using a smart phone. Lately I’ve found myself longing for a good, old-fashioned watch that does one thing well and doesn’t require charging. To satisfy this longing I bought myself a Q&Q Smile by Citizen. It wasn’t very expensive, it’s waterproof, and it looks cool.

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I have a Fitbit which I’ve been using on and off for the past year or so but it keeps going flat and requires regular charging. I’m tired of devices that need constant charging. The Fitbit is also not great for cyclists. I cycle up a hill with a 150kg load and it says I’ve done zero steps and burnt zero calories. I can see how they are motivating for someone who needs to make an effort to include exercise in their day but when exercise is your mode of transport, as it is for me, this is not necessary.  I don’t have to make time for exercise because it just happens when I cycle to the places I want to go. That’s the beauty of active travel.

Other things that don’t require fuel/charging that I like: our push mower. We never have to buy any fuel for it or plug it in. We just push it and it cuts the grass. I love it. Don’t get me wrong: I can see the benefits of a ride-on petrol mower for people who live on a golf course, but we just have a small patch of grass and a push mower is more than adequate.

Our kids are big fans of Horrible Histories, a BBC program which explains history in a very funny and engaging way. I recommend it for anyone with kids. It’s entertaining for adults too.