Theresa Mayhem

It may not be mayhem in the UK, not yet anyway, but I’m becoming increasingly alarmed by Theresa May. She started off with grand statements about equality and working for everyone but I’ve seen nothing encouraging since then and more cause for concern than anything else. One example was Amanda Rudd’s recent statement about having British firms declare the number of foreign workers they employ. I think they may have since back-tracked on this one but as a foreign worker living in Britain let it be known that if I’m kicked out my job goes with me. I will simply move and work elsewhere and my job and my taxes will disappear from Britain. They won’t go to a local person.

Another example was Theresa May’s recent criticisms of the Bank of England. It’s possible the media have exaggerated this but I don’t think so given Mark Carney’s (Bank of England Governor) response. He is quoted as saying,

“We are not going to take instruction on our policies from the political side.”

From what I’ve seen of Mark Carney – he’s brilliant. The UK is very lucky to have him. And no, politicians should not be dictating policy to the Bank of England. The Bank of England is and should be independent.

Since the referendum vote the pound has plunged and inflation is starting to rise. A low pound is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it’s very good for local producers and probably just what the UK needs. Higher prices, particularly for imported goods, might also encourage local manufacturing. Given the choice though, I’d still rather the UK remain a part of the EU.

I see Nicola Sturgeon is hoping for another independence vote for Scotland and I think I will probably vote to leave the UK if that happens, especially if it means Scotland can continue to trade freely with the EU and we won’t have to put up with Theresa May any longer. I also don’t think it’s a bad thing that we’re governed by environmental laws set in the EU especially when those laws have helped to clean up the air and sea.

9 thoughts on “Theresa Mayhem

  1. May’s actions and words since becoming PM have pretty much shown some of the early speculation that she was a closet Remainer giving the incompetent Brexiters enough rope to hang themselves to be just wishful thinking.

    At least the U.S. seems set to convincingly reject Trump, though still with a shamefully high number of voters supporting him.

  2. Like you i worry May is a small view Tory, liable to pander to the narrow viewed members. I don’t see her pro or anti remain credentials now matter given she has only one route she can go which is to lead us out. I was and remain a remain but no government will ignore a 52% vote, whatever the points being made. And it will be a hard brexit because the EU, who are pissed will dictate terms. Like you i actually welcomed the depoliticising of things like Health and Safety and Environmental laws emanating from the commission; it is one thing to be democratic, quite another to politicise such matters and have them at the whim of lobby groups and political horse trading. I hope you don’t get the chance to vote for independence. It won’t help anyone frankly because the social ramifications when Scotland has to pay for itself will be hard to swallow, but I can quite see why Sturgeon would want to rattle that cage just now. It’s just trying to get May to listen to her because I doubt the EU will. Too many nations with too many minorities who the countries don’t want to empower.

    1. Maybe I’m more cynical or ruthless than you, but I can think of many ways a motivated government could set aside the close results of a poorly-drafted nonbinding referendum. A start would be to dismantle the reputations of those who led the Brexit campaign, brick by brick and lie by lie. An easy thing to do, since the principals started on the task themselves even before the referendum, and have only accelerated since.

      1. Well, there’s part of me that would say go for it but I would genuinely fear the constitutional consequences. We have very few referenda so ignoring a clear answer to a clear question would be a big stretch. And there would be a significant financial impact as governments probably fall. UKIP would have the moral high ground – imagine that.

  3. I’ve only a passing familiarity with Theresa May. However, I was encouraged by her very early speeches and then quite disturbed when I heard a news article a week or so ago about what she had planned. She sounded like a neocon to me and worthy of joining the Thatcher/Murdoch brigade. (I’ve forgotten the specifics of the news article.)

    What a useless twat David Cameron was to bring on the Brexit vote and then manage the no campaign so badly. I would have liked to see him forced to deal with the shambles he helped to create.

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