Celebrating small boobs

I recently watched a couple of BBC documentaries: My Small Boobs and I and My Big Breasts and Me. Both were good but the small boobs one was quite sad. It followed three beautiful young women who were deeply unhappy with their appearance. As a small breasted woman myself I thought I would write about how wonderful it is to have small boobs and my boobs are very small. I have no evidence to support this but I wouldn’t be surprised if most men over the age of 40 had bigger boobs than me. So what’s so great about this?

1) They don’t sag. At almost 40 years of age, and two children and five years of breastfeeding, I can still pass the pencil test. This means that when I stick a pencil under either breast, it falls to the floor. Small boobs defy gravity. Why is this so great? See point 2).

2) Bras are optional. I can choose not to wear a bra if I want to, indeed bras don’t do very much since my boobs are pert and taut anyway. Going braless can feel quite sexy especially under tight tops when the outline of the breast and a nipple is visible. I can wear a bra too if I want to but the great thing is that I have the choice.

3) Small boobs are more sensitive to touch. A University of Vienna study found that large boobs are less sensitive than small ones. The explanation for this is that large boobs contain more fatty tissue than glandular tissue and the glandular tissue is the sensitive bit.

4) Small boobs are a good filter for the undesirables. It’s true that some men prefer large breasts and that’s fine. It is a personal preference. But if someone is basing their decision about whether or not to have a relationship with you on the basis of something superficial like boob size, then they’re unlikely to make a good partner. Thank your small boobs for getting rid of them before making this discovery.

5) Small breasted women can wear boob tubes and strapless dresses at any age without fear that something will pop out and without the need for a strapless bra.

I don’t want to make women with large breasts feel inadequate here. There is beauty in all shapes and sizes. My intention really is just to encourage people to be happy with what they’ve got. Self-value and self-confidence is where true beauty lies.

37 thoughts on “Celebrating small boobs

  1. I agree that there are benefits in having small boobs. Good as one gets older. Gravity defying as you say. Still, there have been times when I would really have enjoyed having an attractive cleavage. Difficult to have both. 😦

      1. Exactly! Attractiveness is based on personal taste anyway, what I think is attractive will not be attractive to every other person. Love this post and your blog, enjoying looking around 🙂

  2. I haven’t worn a bra for twenty years on a regular basis. I can sleep on my stomach very comfortably. 🙂
    But did go through some years feeling inadequate. 😦

  3. Surely titchy tits are a huge advantage for the actually important life stuff that is anything to do with gravity (walking, running etc). I always thought it was big breasts that were the big disadvantage in life… Not that I can use mine as an excuse for my lack of sporting achievement, as they are probably medium sized.

    jules

    1. Yes, I was nearly going to make the point about running and jumping but decided not to. It’s true though, small breasts are well suited for sporty things like this.

  4. I have always preferred small breasted women. I agree, small breasts are sexier. And, the women are more interesting and, I suspect smarter. Big boobs get in the way of a lot things including a good conversation.

  5. I certainly appreciate the way you get things right out there and talk about them. I am sure this article will help many women who might have twinges of inadequacy. There are many factors more important than breast size in choosing a partner. I have always found athletic women with small breasts attractive, and I have been criticized for that. One of my friends suggested that I might be a closet homosexual because of it. There should be an understanding between the sexes that size does not matter. Neither sex should judge the other on the basis of the size of their private parts.

    1. I love red hair. It’s just the best. I hope you really love it now. I have two sisters with red hair but somehow I missed out 😦

      And yep, I sometimes sleep on my tummy too.

  6. I wish mine were smaller- another good thing about being smaller is that you will be less likely to have problems with yeast infections that happen in larger ladies as underneath the breast tissue is a lovely warm, damp environment perfect for fungi growth- My daughter nuzzles into me then says ‘Mum, you smell like bread’!… There is also far less likelihood of shoulder aches and pains and upper back problem which contributes towards the dowagers hump or neck craning forward as a result of trying to overcome extra ‘front baggage’- Its expensive and time consuming to find a bra that fits properly and they require frequent replacement. Birds are adapted so that their reproductive organs only grow when they are needed for nesting, moulting etc- Its a shame that humans don’t have the same set up at times- I guess I might not want to make a nest for the whole family in or find the guy with the nicest nest then off and bonk with the loudest best looking one to go back to mr nice nest…It would be great if it was possible to put all the reproductive gear into storage or whatever like the beds in a ryokan when they are not being used- I can sleep on my tummy though…apart from when I was obviously pregnant!

    1. The BBC documentary about women with larger breasts did talk about some of the side-effects like back and neck pain. It didn’t sound very pleasant. Breast reduction surgery is not an easy option either as it comes with risks and is a much more difficult operation than breast augmentation surgery. One woman was carrying around the weight of a kilogram of sugar for each breast on her chest. That’s huge!

  7. Boobs are great, aren’t they? 😀

    My mum had some fairly major breast reduction surgery years ago and it made a real difference to her quality of life (she’s just a wee lady). I think my sister will eventually opt for the same, having clearly inherited Mum’s genes.

    1. I’m glad everything turned out well for your mum. I didn’t realise breast reduction surgery was such a major operation until I watched the other BBC documentary.

      I’m hoping my daughter inherits the boobs from my side of the family 🙂

  8. I couldn’t agree more that those who judge on physical appearance probably don’t make good partners. I’ve had far too many friends/people who sort of ‘discard’ girls based on that alone. :/

      1. I think it’s good for them. They are automatically being filtered from the people who might otherwise want to be with them just for their appearances. As a result they’re more likely to end up with people/partners who have true feelings for them. 🙂

  9. After debating myself decided to comment on the most vulgar t-shirt I’ve ever seen. Sat in with a band for the night. Small place. Will always remember. A woman lets say flat chested on the front of t-shirt had “In case of rape this side up” Disgusting huh, Did not talk to her, showed me all i needed to know.This my not be in line with the other comments. Had to say because of my appreciation for big and small. Was not a dive or high class joint just never went back. One of those wish could be unseen. This was over twenty years ago but still.

  10. Hi Rachel – thanks for sharing. Like you I also watched those documentaries and had a similar reaction. I like the angle of “celebrating” small boobs. I agree with you that it shouldn’t be about making other women feel inadequate or about saying f*** you to the rest of the world, rather it should be about positivity and celebrating what you have.

    1. Thanks for your comment! I love your username and your site is great. I love having small boobs and even dislike wearing push-up and padded bras because they somehow feel “not me”. I don’t understand why anyone would want to get breast implants.

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